1.Restoration of Buildings from around the 1820s (National Isolation Period)

Phase ⅠRestoration Project (Completion in 2000)
Ⅰ-1 

First Ship Captain’s Quarters(MAPⅠ-1)

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This room that the dutch captains and other dutch company officers lived in has been replicated on the 2nd floor. The 1st floor was a storage room.


Ⅰ-2 

No.1 Warehouse(MAPⅠ-2)

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THis warehouse was used mainly to store sugar. Dejima’s  restoration methods and excarvted relics are displayed.


Ⅰ-3 

No.2 Warehouse(MAPⅠ-3)

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Sappanwood plants which were used as raw material for dyes were stored here. Traded goods and the way the trading worked is explained here.


Ⅰ-4 

Deputy Factor’s Quarters (MAPⅠ-4)

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This was the residence of the Dutch East India Company Deputy Factor second in command on Dejima. Instead of beind restored, the interior is used as a museum shop and toilet.

(※This building is now closed due to repair work, but the museum shop is open.
The toilet and toilet for Ostomate are not available.
Please use the toilet, toilet for wheelchair or Ostomate in Clerk’s Quarters))


Ⅰ-5 

Kitchen(MAPⅠ-5)

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The kitchen that meals for the Dutch officials were repared in has been replicated here.

Phase ⅡRestoration Project (Completion in 2006)
Ⅱ-1 

No.3 Warehouse(MAPⅡ-1)

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Sugar, which is an important part of Nagasaki’s dietary culture, was stored here, It was imported from Taiwan at first and the form Indonesia.


Ⅱ-2 

Head Clerk’s Quarters (MAP Ⅱ-2)

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This was the residence for the Dutch general secretary, who was in charge of book entry. Here you can see the introduction of Dutch Studies introduced at Dejima here.


Ⅱ-3 

Chief Factor’s Residence (MAPⅡ-5)

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This is where the Chief Factor of Dejima lived.
On the 2nd floor, a Christmas banquet has been replicated and you can see what hsi work was like.
On the 1st floor, you can enjoy a hands-on exhibit.


Ⅱ-4 

Japanese Official’s Office  (MAP Ⅱ-4)

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The way the Japanese officials worked who supported Dejima’s trading and the daily life of Dutch officials is explained here.


Ⅱ-5 

Sea Gate (MAP Ⅱ-5)

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This is the symbolic architecture of Dejima. Culture, studies and trading goods from Western countries and Japan came and went through this gate first. The south door was for import and the north door was for export.

Phase ⅢRestoration Project (Completion in 2016)
Ⅲ-1 

No.16 Warehouse (MAPⅢ-1)

This warehouse was used to store cloves. It is now used as a feature exhibition room and storage room.


Ⅲ-2 

Clerk’s Quarters (MAPⅢ-2)

The way Dejima connected with the world and the rest of Japan through trade and cultural exchange is introduced in an easy-to-understand way.


Ⅲ-3 

No.14 Warehouse (MAPⅢ-3)

It used to be a storage for sugar. The relics that were excavated underneath the warehouse, the way Dejima was connected, and the bridge that connects Dejima and the mainland of Nagasaki are introduced here.


Ⅲ-4 

Town Elder’s Room(MAPⅢ-4)

This is where the Japanese officials were stationed to oversee who enters and exits through the main gate.


Ⅲ-5 

Foreman’s Room(MAPⅢ-5)

Despite its name, this was a place for packaging and weighing copper.


Ⅲ-6 

Copper Warehouse (MAPⅢ-6)

The way in which Dejima’s main export, copper, was stored is replicated here and the history of how Japan and the world were connected through copper is explained in a video.